Archive for the ‘National Nutrition Month’ Category

“Mighty Mushroom Menu” Pinterest Contest

This March, National Nutrition Month, boost your health – and menu – with mushrooms.

Starting tomorrow (March 1), show us what’s on your healthy menu by creating a “Mighty Mushroom Menu” Pinterest board. Fill it with at least 10 nutritional recipes to help you stay focused on health this month. Follow the simple instructions below for a chance to win money to buy your mighty menu – a $100 gift card from the Mushroom Council!

Mighty Mushroom Contest

Contest Rules: http://www.mushroominfo.com/mighty-menu-rules/

Baked Sausage and Mushroom Frittata Muffins

Incorporate The Blend into your morning – or brunch – routine starting with these baked sausage and mushroom frittata muffins from Aggie’s Kitchen.

Baked Sausage and Mushroom Frittata Muffins by Aggies Kitchen

I started making baked frittata muffins for my family about a year ago and we are officially hooked! They are so simple to put together and the variety of fillings are endless, making them even more appealing in my opinion. What I love about frittata muffins is that they are portion controlled, making them perfect for a light breakfast, snack or for offering at brunch where other foods will be served. A dozen of these savory Baked Sausage & Mushroom Frittata Muffins would round out a brunch menu quite nicely if you ask me. My favorite part of a brunch menu is the opportunity to try a little bit of several things, so these muffin-sized frittatas will fit right in.

Using The Blend concept, I was able to cut back on the amount of Italian sausage I used in this recipe with chopped mushrooms. Such a winning concept since you can basically please all the meat eaters in your group, yet know that what you are serving is a little bit more nutritious – without sacrificing texture or flavor. I used baby bella mushrooms in this recipe, but white button mushrooms would be great as well. Enjoy!

Baked Sausage and Mushroom Frittata Muffins

Ingredients:

2 fresh Italian chicken sausage links (about 1/3 pound), casings removed
8 0z whole baby bella mushrooms, chopped
1 shallot, chopped
2 handfuls fresh spinach leaves, chopped
9 eggs
1/4 cup whole milk
1 cup shredded mozzarella
cooking spray

Directions:

Heat oven to 400 degrees. Spray a 12-cup muffin pan liberally with cooking spray.

In a large nonstick skillet, brown and crumble Italian chicken sausage. Add shallots and chopped mushrooms, season with salt and pepper and cook for about 5 minutes, until softened. Add chopped spinach and cook for another 3-4 minutes until spinach is completely wilted. Turn off heat and set aside.

In a large mixing bowl, whisk together 9 eggs. Add milk and continue to whisk until eggs and milk are blended. Stir in mozzarella cheese.

Using a tablespoon, add sausage, mushroom and spinach mixture evenly into each muffin cup. Carefully pour egg mixture into each cup, using the spoon to gently lift the sausage mixture so that egg mixture reaches the bottom of cup.

Bake for 15 minutes. Let cool for about 5 minutes, then carefully run a knife around edges of egg muffins to separate from pan. Let cool for another 5 minutes then remove egg muffins completely from pan. Serve with fresh fruit and other brunch favorites!

Baked Sausage and Mushroom Frittata Muffins by Aggies Kitchen Baked Sausage and Mushroom Frittata Muffins by Aggies Kitchen Baked Sausage and Mushroom Frittata Muffins by Aggies Kitchen

Double the Mushroom Love Meatloaf

Paula from Bell’alimento kicks off National Nutrition Month with a meatloaf recipe that guarantees a dose of mushrooms in every bite. Discover her secret below.  

Mushroom Blendability Meatloaf by Bellalimento

Meatloaf is an American classic. Its comfort food at its finest and if you’re in our house you would be breaking a law if it’s not served with mashed potatoes. At least that’s what my Grandma told us. There is no doubt with this meatloaf that you’re going to want to have those garlic mashed potatoes to go with the divine mushroom sauce. One bite and this recipe is sure to be your family’s favorite new meatloaf recipe.

What makes this recipe so special? We’ve added mushrooms INTO the meatloaf as well as the sauce. We’ve pulsed up a portion of the mushrooms in a food processor to give the meatloaf an earthy undertone. The three varieties of meat keep it lean and mean. The sauce, well that’s the kicker. It’s full on mushroom love.

Go ahead and give it a try. We know you’ll love it as much as we do.

Blended Mushroom Meatloaf with Mushroom Sauce

Prep Time:
Cook Time:
Serves 4-6

Ingredients:

  • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 16 ounces cremini mushrooms – divided
  • kosher salt/pepper
  • 1 tablespoon fresh thyme
  • 4 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 2 3/4 cups broth – divided
  • 1/2 cup half/half
  • 1 1/2 pounds meatloaf blend (beef, pork, veal)
  • 1/2 onion – minced
  • 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
  • 1/2 cup panko bread crumbs
  • 1 egg – beaten

Directions:

  1. Into a large oven proof skillet melt butter over medium heat. Add 12 ounces sliced mushrooms. Season with salt, pepper and thyme. Cook until mushrooms are softened.
  2. Sprinkle flour on top of mushrooms. Stir until well coated. Add 2 1/2 cups of broth. Continue cooking until mixture begins to thicken. Add cream and remove from heat.
  3. Preheat oven to 325 degrees.
  4. Pulse remaining 4 ounces of mushrooms in a food processor.
  5. Into a large bowl add: meat, onion, Worcestershire, 1/4 cup broth, panko, egg and mushrooms. Mix until just combined.
  6. Form into two equal loafs and place into skillet (in sauce). Transfer to oven and bake for approximately 1 hour or until meat is cooked through.
  7. Skim fat off sauce prior to serving.

Mushroom Lovers Cheesy Pizza Dip

Kristen Doyle from Dine and Dish turned a comforting dish from her childhood into a mushroom rich dish her kids can’t get enough of.

As the mother of small children and a lover of veggies (especially mushrooms) I am constantly trying to pack extra nutrition into the different foods we eat. It’s not often that we have a dish with no veggies in it at all. I’ve had success with both sneaking them in and sharing them out in the open. Mushrooms are one of my favorite vegetables to add into recipes to amplify the flavor and nutritional value of the foods we eat. Everything from our favorite scrambled eggs, burgers on the grill, to the pizza we have for dinner gets a handful or two of mushrooms added to it. My kids love mushrooms and I enjoy knowing that by adding this simple ingredient to what we eat, I am boosting the vitamins and antioxidants that go into our bodies.

One thing I’ve been eating since I was a teen is pizza dip. It was an easy, weeknight dinner my mom used to make, but she never added vegetables. I’ve adapted my mom’s recipe to include a vegetable we all know and love… mushrooms! I never have to question whether my kids are going to eat when we have pizza dip for dinner. It gets gobbled down quickly, without any complaints. Served with chips and alongside a nice side salad and some garlic bread, this dip transforms from being an appetizer, to a hearty and filling meal.

What is your favorite recipe you add mushrooms to?

Mushroom Lovers Pizza Dip by Dine and Dish 

 Mushroom Lovers Cheesy Pizza Dip

Serves 4-6

Ingredients:

• 1 8-ounce package light cream cheese

• 1 cup light sour cream

• 1 cup pizza sauce (jarred or homemade)

• 1 ½ cup shredded mozzarella cheese

• 4 ounces fresh mushrooms, washed and chopped

• 4 ounces fresh mushrooms, washed and sliced

Directions:

1. Preheat oven to 350°F

2. Blend together cream cheese and sour cream until smooth. Spread into a 9 inch pie dish.

3. Stir together the chopped mushrooms and pizza sauce. Pour over sour cream mixture.

4. Top with shredded cheese then finish with remaining sliced mushrooms.

5. Bake for 25-30 minutes or until mushrooms are tender and cheese is hot and bubbly.

6. Serve hot with tortilla chips.

Getting Kids to Eat More Fruits and Veggies: Stay the Course or Change Direction?

David Grotto, RDN, discusses that there is no room for throwing in the towel when it comes to getting veggies on the plate; it’s all about the approach.

 

Kid Friendly Pinterest Board - Mushroom Channel

 

Being a nutrition expert doesn’t always matter when it comes to getting my kids to eat healthier. This is especially true for foods that may taste funny, have a weird mouth-feel or  include something that my daughters’ friends would not be caught dead eating. Kids’ preferences for foods seem to change like the wind, so the question is – should you change your approach in how to get them to eat healthier? Here are some of my favorite tips to get veggies on the plate for the entire family.

Stay the course and reinforce. Set up your home environment for success – abandoning ship is NOT an option. Have fruits and vegetables available in abundance but in ready-to-eat forms. Wash fruits and veggies and have them cut up and ready-to-go and in plain site. My kids really like these after school snacks:

  • Celery, pepper and jicama strips cut in 4” pieces served with a fat-free cream cheese dip or salsa.
  • Cucumber slices and low fat sour cream mixed with onion, garlic powder, salt and pepper served on cocktail rye bread.
  • Mix berries in a bowl with a tablespoon each of honey and balsamic vinegar and a teaspoon of vanilla extract.

Change Direction by Using a Sneak Attack. Until about five years ago, my teenage daughters never knew that salmon wasn’t another variety of chicken. I remember one of my daughters exclaiming, “I love this chicken and could eat it every day” after taste-testing a grilled salmon smothered in cherry salsa recipe for my first book. My wife and I turned to each other and said to her, “Glad you like it!” I’m happy to say, seven years later, my kids aren’t in counseling sessions for the emotional scars left behind from our non-disclosure of that fateful meal. But many parents feel guilty if they try to “hide” healthy foods in dishes that their kids enjoy.

In the *American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, researcher Barbara Rolls, PhD, from Penn State University, conducted a study with 3-5 year olds where vegetables were hidden in entrees served to them. She found that overall vegetable consumption increased by 50% though hiding vegetables in the entrees though did not affect the amount of vegetable side dishes consumed.  Sneaking in veggies that your kids aren’t particularly fond of isn’t “throwing in the towel”. You may find in time that their tastes change and they will welcome those once hidden vegetables back to being in the spotlight where they belong. But for now, just get them in! Continue to celebrate the ones they do love but arm yourself with these techniques to help them bridge the gap between healthy recommendations and consumption.

  • Swap out ½ ground beef for chopped mushrooms in their favorite burger, taco and meatloaf recipes.
  • Puree left over vegetables and freeze them. Add fresh or frozen pureed spinach to taco meat or brownie mix. Add pureed carrots, sweet potato or butternut squash to macaroni and cheese; smoothies and spaghetti sauce.
  • Don’t feel like pureeing vegetables? Use jarred baby food or shelf stable vegetable purees that are now in the marketplace.

What do you think about sneaking in veggies? Do you have any other ideas for getting kids to eat more fruits and veggies? Let’s hear about them!

*Spill MK, Birch LL, Roe LS, Rolls BJ. “Hiding vegetables to reduce energy density: an effective strategy to increase children’s vegetable intake and reduce energy intake.” Am J Clin Nutr. 2011 Sep; 94(3):735-41.