Posts Tagged ‘mushroom soup’

Creamy Roasted Mushroom Parsnip Soup

Soup weather is here, meaning it’s time to get out of the cold and curl up with a big bowl (or two!). This creamy soup by Chez Us is rich, smooth, and believe it or not, doesn’t contain any dairy. It’s a great option for lunch or dinner.

Creamy Roasted Mushroom Parsnip Soup by Chez Us

I use to be more of a fair weather cook which meant I enjoyed the warmer seasons and took full advantage of summer’s bounty. Now, I have to admit that I am more of a cold weather home chef and enjoy nothing more than the comfort of a hearty soup or stew to warm up chilly evenings. The days and nights have finally begun to chill down in California, and I have begun taking advantage by making big pots of hearty soups. This recipe for Roasted Mushroom Parsnip Soup came about after a trip to London where I fell in love with a similar hearty recipe.

I am big on making creamy soups that do not require dairy to create that smooth, creamy texture. I achieve this indulgent bowl of soup, by using ingredients that are rich in flavor, cooking them long and slow, then pureeing in a food processor. Everyone is surprised at how flavorful the soups are without the added richness of cream or milk.

Creamy Roasted Mushroom Parsnip Soup by Chez Us

The depth of this recipe comes from roasting the mushrooms and parsnips before simmering with the other ingredients. While I roast root vegetables all the time, I did not begin working on roasted mushroom recipes until recently. I LOVE the character that comes with roasting mushrooms, even more so than sautéing them. Roasting the mushrooms adds a crazy depth to an already delicious ingredient by bringing out the earthy flavor and creating a rich, caramelized color.

Creamy Roasted Mushroom Parsnip Soup by Chez Us

Roasted Mushroom Parsnip Soup

What I love the most about this winter recipe is how easy it is to make, and how rich and flavorful it is.

Ingredients:
1 pound cremini mushrooms, cleaned and cut into quarters
1 pound parsnips, peeled and cut into 1″ pieces
3 tablespoons + 2 teaspoons olive oil
1/3 cup leek, whites only, thinly sliced
1 clove garlic, smashed
1 teaspoon dried thyme
5 cups vegetable stock
1/4 pound shiitake mushrooms, cleaned and thinly sliced
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 clove garlic, finely minced
sprigs of thyme
kosher salt, to taste
black pepper to taste

Method:
• Preheat the oven to 425.
• Place the parsnips on a baking sheet, drizzle 1 tablespoon of olive oil over the top and toss to mix. Roast for 15 minutes.
• Remove the parsnips from the oven and add the mushrooms. Drizzle the remaining 2 tablespoons of olive oil over the top, using a spoon stir to mix. Roast for 15 minutes.
• In a dutch oven heat 2 teaspoons of olive oil over medium low heat, then add the leeks. Stir and cook until soft, about 3 – 5 minutes.
• Add 1 of the cloves of garlic (the smashed one). Stir.
• Then add the mushroom mixture, thyme and the stock. Stir.
• Bring to a boil, then lower the heat to a very low simmer and cook for 30 minutes.
• Let cool for 5 minutes.
• Using a food processor, in batches puree the mixture until smooth.
• Return to the dutch oven. Season with salt and pepper then gently reheat over very low heat.
• In a small saucepan heat the 2 tablespoons of olive oil over medium low heat. Add the shiitake mushrooms, stir and cook until lightly golden. This will take about 5 minutes. Stir in the garlic and season with salt and pepper.
• To serve place some of the soup in a soup bowl, garnish with some of the shiitake mushrooms and a sprig of thyme.

Cream of Mushroom Soup

Chef Billy Parisi is back to share his umami-rich cream of mushroom soup recipe; sure to please during the Thanksgiving season!

Creamy Of Mushroom Soup By Chef Billy Parisi

As soon as the weather even hints that cold is on the way, I’m making soup especially a Cream of Mushroom Soup! This year in Chicago though we’ve been incredibly spoiled with this 60° weather we’ve been having. It’s crazy to think that Thanksgiving is just a few weeks away and it’s still nice out. Regardless, I’ll take it, but that still doesn’t mean I haven’t been whipping up some delicious soups!

Creamy Of Mushroom Soup By Chef Billy Parisi

I love to get it out of the norm when it comes to cooking traditions especially things like thanksgiving. I mean I have been eating turkey for 34 years of my life and I’m over it, no offense. I want prime rib, roasted potatoes, cheese cake, just something that is different. In fact I think planning a coursed meal should be in store for your Turkey Day! Start with a small appetizer, then a soup, salad, entrée, and finally dessert.

I’ll give you a quick lesson on soup. It’s the most important course in any meal because so often it is the first and heck if you can’t get soup right what makes anyone think you know how to cook an entrée? Soup requires time, love, and lots of browning in fat. Mushrooms for example make for the perfect hearty soup. Combine then with bacon, cream, garlic and parsley and you’ve got a simple delicious soup that will for sure be a favorite at your Turkey Day Table!

Creamy Of Mushroom Soup By Chef Billy Parisi

Since I know bacon and mushrooms go so well together I decided I would render some bacon fat and roast off some onions, celery, garlic and mushrooms in the fat so that it can infuse all that delicious pork flavor. From there I deglazed with white wine, see the gif below, and then added in some chicken stock and simmered on low for an hour.

To me soups are all about toppings so some garlic and Parmesan sourdough croutons were a must for this soup. Here’s how easy they are to make. Toss some sourdough cubes in a bowl with some melted butter, fresh chopped garlic, Parmesan cheese, salt and pepper and bake in the oven for 20 minutes on 375°, boom croutons!

Creamy Of Mushroom Soup By Chef Billy Parisi

For the soup itself I used a combination of baby portabellas, button mushrooms, shitake mushrooms and oyster mushrooms. I saved a few extra, seared them over high heat in olive oil and then used them as a garnish. I’m tellin’ you when it comes to soup it’s all about the toppings!

Creamy Of Mushroom Soup By Chef Billy Parisi

Can you imagine how psyched your guests would be if they came to a coursed Thanksgiving Day meal and you started it off with a delicious cream of mushroom soup loaded with umami flavors and roasted vegetables? I mean I’d be impressed.

The day after Thanksgiving is such a great day filled with leftovers and football and there is nothing, I mean nothing more comforting and therapeutic than eating soup on days like that, and this Cream of Mushroom Soup is perfect for it!

Creamy Of Mushroom Soup By Chef Billy Parisi

Cream of Mushroom Soup

Yield: Makes 1 gallon

Ingredients:
8 slices of chopped bacon
1 small diced yellow onion
6 small diced stalks of celery
4 finely minced cloves of garlic
1 pint of button mushrooms
1 pint of baby portabella mushrooms
1 cup of shitake mushroom caps
1 cups of oyster mushrooms, stems removed
¼ cup of flour
1 cup of chardonnay
64 ounces of chicken stock
2 cups of heavy cream
2 tablespoons of chopped fresh parsley
Kosher salt and cracked pepper to taste
Fresh thyme leaves for garnish
shredded Parmesan for garnish

Procedures:
1. In a large pot on high heat render the bacon fat until the bacon lardons become crispy.
2. Remove the bacon and add in the onions, celery and garlic and saute for 8 to 10 minutes over medium-high heat or until lightly browned.
3. Next, add in the mushrooms are cook for 20 to 25 minutes or until the mushrooms are browned.
4. Sprinkle in and stir in the flour until it has been completely mixed in.
5. Deglaze with the white wine and cook until it is almost gone.
6. Add in the chicken stock and bring it to a boil and until it becomes thick.
7. Puree the mushroom soup until smooth with a hand blender or a regular blender.
8. Return the pureed soup to the pot and finish with the heavy cream, parsley, salt and pepper.
9. Garnish with croutons, crispy bacon lardons, fresh thyme and Parmesan.

Top 10 Highlights of the 2013 Mushroom Fest

James Beard award-nominated writer, editor, and recipe developer, Joy Manning attended the 28th annual Mushroom Festival in Kennett Square on behalf of The Mushroom Council. Take a look at her top ten highlights and mark your calendars for next September. 

Flavorful and nutritious, mushrooms are the kind of ingredient that can inspire a party. And for the past 28 years, mushroom growers and the eaters who love them have made the annual Mushroom Festival in Kennett Square, Pa., one of the biggest and best parties in food. Spanning the weekend after Labor Day each year, it extends the summer fun one weekend longer with live music, contests, games, a car show, carnival rides, and—of course—tons of delicious food. I had such a great time during my visit this year that I’ve already earmarked that weekend for mushrooms in 2014. Here my top 10 highlights from this year’s fest. If you were there, too, please leave your own highlights in the comments!

Farm Tour

On the quick bus ride between the festival and the Caputo & Guest Mushrooms farm, our driver asked the crowd on board who had driven more than 100 miles to be at the festival. Hands shot up all around the bus, with some folks coming from as far away as California. That should be no surprise—mushroom lovers are an enthusiastic bunch. Mark Malchione, the farm manager, led the tour of the mushroom house, where we saw every stage of the process, from the logs that are made from grains and sawdust to give the mushrooms nutrients and a place to grow, to tiny newly sprouted spores and fully sprouted shiitakes looking ready to slice into a stir fry. Malchione also provided a great shopping tip: look under the cap when buying shiitakes. They should look fresh, unblemished and creamy white. His definitely did.

Talula’s Table

Many food fanatics around the country are already familiar with Talula’s Table, a Kennett Square market and restaurant that is known as one of the most difficult-to-get reservations in the US. What the chefs there may be less known for is their dexterity with mushrooms. They made a variety of treats inspired by the local bounty, including wonderfully crisp mushroom spring rolls.

Chef Jack Mavraj in the Culinary Tent

There was a full roster of great chefs—include celeb Carla Hall–doing mushroom-centric demonstrations in the Culinary Tent. I watched Kennett Square’s own chef Jack Mavraj shake his skillet for the crowd. He cooked homemade agnolotti, fresh pasta dumplings stuffed with three kinds of mushrooms and braised short ribs. He also made a robust four-mushroom sauce—filled with shiitake, oyster, cremini, and maitake mushrooms—to serve with the pasta and short ribs. I may make a vegetarian version in my own kitchen this fall.

Mushroom Shopping

At a couple stands throughout the festival, tables were set up with tons of different local mushrooms for sale. Obviously, the wares could not have been fresher. They were clearly just picked! Some oyster mushrooms were $8 pound—about half the price I might pay in the supermarket. It was the perfect place for someone like me, who cooks with mushrooms a few times a week, to stock up.

Oyster Mushroom Fritters with Feta, Hot Sauce and Spring Greens

Low in calories and rich in nutrients like selenium and Vitamin D, mushrooms have rightly earned their place in the pantheon of good-for-you foods. That doesn’t mean they aren’t also perfect deep fried and served with cheese, spicy sauce, and a salad. The meaty oyster mushrooms tasted almost like boneless chicken wings, especially when mixed with the cheese and sauce. Would I eat this every day? No. Am I counting down the days until I eat it again at 2014’s mushroom festival? Yes.

Breaded Button Mushrooms

Another delicious choice in fried mushrooms: the classic breaded mushroom. I have always appreciated a pizzeria that sells these kind of fried mushrooms, just plain buttons covered in a basic, crunchy breading. At the festival, this classic got a big upgrade just from the pristine, fresh local mushrooms that were used.

Official Mushroom Festival Soup

Even though it was a warm beautiful day, everyone at the festival seemed to want a bowl of steaming mushroom soup. Something about the mushroom’s deep earthy flavor makes for such a perfect bowl of comfort, and the official soup of the festival was no different.

Painted Mushrooms

Not every mushroom highlight was edible. On display at various shops throughout Kennett Square were beautiful, hand-painted mushrooms. Local artists projected their visions onto concrete mushroom forms three feet high; the results decorated the festival and were sold via silent auction.

Mushroom Growers Exhibit

The big shady tent where growers set up tables to represent all the stages of the mushroom growing process was a huge draw. Kids, parents, and grandparents all seemed equally captivated at how the process works. Best of all, the growers themselves were on hand to chat with festivalgoers and patiently answer all the questions everyone had about their work.

Ice Cream Stop at La Michoacana 

As I headed out of the festival, my last stop had to be dessert. The homemade ice cream churned at La Michoacan is a must for any visit to Kennett Square. The shop was into the spirit of the event with plenty of mushroom ice cream bars on hand, and this was clearly a popular choice.

Seasonal Soups with Mushrooms

It would seem that a solid half of the US is experiencing a classically damp, cool fall day and that is nothing if not the ultimate in soup weather.  This particular editor has a  handy dandy “test kitchen” that’s been waiting for a night like this one to share a few fresh ideas. Both of these soups are lighter on calories but will leave you toasty and satisfied the whole night through.

Pictured up top is the Mushroom Barley Soup found via Post Punk Kitchen. Her photo is miles prettier than the one a snapped minutes before digging in but I stand heartily by the deliciousness of that recipe. Don’t skimp on the freshly shopped herbs on top- extra dill brightens the whole bowl!

The second soup in our arsenal could really be any soup- my point is that it’s all about the accessorizing.  The soup pictured just happens to be a beautiful Potato, Celery Root and Sunchoke Soup from Cannelle et Vanille. I love pureed soups because they taste so rich but I rarely find they need cream.

Instead I want to load in extra texture, which is where my mushrooms came into play.  Forget the bacon bits in potato soups, you guys. Just chop a mixed lot of mushrooms, saute them in a little extra virgin olive oil and season accordingly.  I added a little cinnamon when I paired them with Butternut Squash and Apple Soup and I added a little cumin for the Potato, Celery Root and Sunchoke Soup pictured above. In both cases, the mushrooms provided just the right amount of variety in the midst of a warm, creamy stew.

Do you share our love of a warm, hearty bowl for lunch and/or dinner? Any favorite mushroom varieties you’d care to share on a dark and stormy night?

Cream of Mushroom Soup from Chez Us

This post comes to us from 2011 Mushroom Channel contributors Denise and Lenny – the brains and appetites behind Chez Us. We love that they took a classic and truly maximized the mushrooms by using a mix of types, blending some and leaving other in slices for additional texture. Really looking forward to trying it at home!


We are excited that this is our first recipe for the Mushroom Channel.  Just as exciting for us, is getting the chance to meet all of you.  We have at least one thing in common, and that is mushrooms.  We look forward to learning more about what the eaters of the Mushroom Channel like, and how we can develop recipes to make you hungry for more MUSHROOMS!

We have been playing around with this mushroom soup recipe for a couple months;  long before we knew we would become Mushroom Channel contributors.  The first few attempts at this recipe, were good, but not quite what we were hungry for.  We wanted something creamy, hearty, flavorful… and easy.  We finally got it right, and just in time to share it with all of you.

This cream of mushroom soup is definitely not what you would think of reaching for when that craving for cream of mushroom soup hits. Our version is light, earthy, full of texture, and a little bit spicy.  You will learn over the next few months, that we are all about texture and spice.

For this recipe, we used a mixture of cremini and portabella mushrooms which are readily available at most markets.  We did not want this soup to be pasty;  it had to have substance.  Instead of pureeing all of the mushroom mixture, we pureed, half of the mixture with the cream and starch, and then combined it with the remainder of the mushroom mixture.  This technique left us with a bowl of soup that had  a creamy broth, and thick, meaty mushroom pieces in every bite.

If you are a vegetarian or gluten free don’t shy away, this recipe is adaptable for you. We have made it with gluten free, rich vegetable stock, lemony-chicken stock, as well as a deep beefy stock;  all versions came out equally as delicious. We’ve also used potato starch and flour as thickeners;  both work perfectly.

To make a complete meal, we like to serve this soup with a leafy green salad and warm, crusty bread.


Recipe:  Cream of Mushroom Soup
*makes 4 hearty servings or 6 light servings

  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1/2 yellow onion
  • 1 large garlic clove, minced
  • 1 pound cremini  mushrooms, cleaned and sliced
  • 1 medium portabella, cleaned and sliced
  • 4 springs thyme, leaves only
  • 1 teaspoon Basque paprika or other spicy paprika
  • 4 cups stock, your choice
  • 1 cup half and half
  • 2 tablespoons potato starch or flour
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • handful minced parsley
  • kosher salt to taste
  • black pepper to taste

In a large dutch oven or sauce pan, heat the olive oil, over medium heat. Add the onions, lower heat to a low medium, and cook until soft; about 10 minutes. Add the garlic, thyme, and cook for 5 minutes. Add the sliced mushrooms, and continue to cook over low heat, for 7 minutes. Sprinkle in the paprika, and stir. Add the beef stock, lower the heat to a low simmer; cook for 20 minutes. Remove from heat, and let cool for 10 minutes. Put half of the stock mixture, and about a fourth of the mushrooms, into a blender or food processor, add the half and half and the starch or flour. Give it a couple whirls until the mushrooms are broken up, and the mixture is fairly lump free. Put the mixture back into the stock pot, with the remaining stock and mushrooms. Gently reheat, over low heat. Stir in the butter. Season with salt and pepper. Serve. Eat.