Posts Tagged ‘pizza’

Get Out the Grill!

Get out the grill: mushrooms are bringing the heat!

Get out the grill & top with mushrooms!

July is National Grilling Month, and what better way to celebrate than by putting our favorite fungi over the flame? Lighten up the quintessential summertime burger by blending in mushrooms, or add some pizazz to the party with a mushroom-grilled pizza. Whatever you do, bring the sizzle to your backyard barbeque with mushrooms!

MAD Greens - blended burger 3 burger image 16x9
Chef Dan Long’s Blended Burger
This healthful take on the classic summer burger will be a hit at any grill out.

Mushroom-Skewers
Grilled Rosemary Mushroom Skewers
Substitute a rosemary sprig for a traditional skewer as a fun twist during summer parties.

Easy-Kefta-Kebob-Recipe-7-of-8-1_girlandthekitchen
Easy Mushroom Kefta Kebobs
Tender, juicy and bursting with flavor, blended beef-mushroom kefta kebobs are perfectly char-grilled on an open fire.

Mushroom Caramelized Onion Flatbread Waiting on Martha (1)
Mushroom, Caramelized Onion & Blue Cheese Flatbreads
Pile your pizza high with crimini mushrooms and fresh arugula – then grill to perfection!

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Mushroom Spinach Sausage Patties
Simple, healthy and delicious mushroom sausage patties are Paleo- and Whole30-friendly!

Marinated Mushrooms
Marinated Grilled Mushrooms
Served simple or gourmet, grilled mushrooms are a simple (and yummy) addition to summer dishes.

Mushroom Pizza with Cambozola and Cherries from Savour-Fare

This pizza perfect post comes directly from Kate, the brains behind Savour-Fare. Kate’s creations have been featured on Food52, Tastepotting, Foodgawker, Foodista and The Pioneer Woman’s Tasty Kitchen.

When it comes to pizza toppings, mushrooms are pretty classic.  The combination of a rich tomato sauce, gooey mozzarella cheese and mild brown mushrooms is the stuff of high school date nights, family dinners at the Jersey shore, and Friday night phone calls by frazzled parents to the local delivery joint.  But while familiar can be good, it can also be a little boring.  You might look at the combination of mushrooms and pizza and yawn, thinking you’ve seen it all before.

But you would be wrong.

There’s a reason that mushroom pizza is a classic.  Nothing quite replicates the intense savoriness of a sautéed mushroom, which gives the pizza an instant flavor boost.  For this dish, I prefer the rich flavor of shiitakes, which are easy to find in my neck of the woods, to a milder button mushroom, but you can also do this with portobellos, cremini or any full flavored mushroom. Pair the mushrooms with a brush of good quality olive oil, a few slices of a rich blue cheese to enhance the mushrooms’ natural umami, and a pop of something sweet, and you’ve got yourself an elegant and unexpected hors d’oeuvre, or an easy weeknight dinner that’s a break from your ordinary routine.

The beauty of this recipe is that it can be made in almost  no time at all, apart from the actual dough.  You can buy prepared pizza dough at many markets these days, or make your own (my favorite recipe for pizza dough can be found here).  Form your dough into the desired shape (I always like oval, since it fits so much better into my oven, and it slices up nicely as an appetizer) and preheat your oven to HOT.    Slice up the mushrooms, sauté them quickly with some garlic and olive oil, then top your pizza dough with your mushrooms, slices of cheese and fruit.  After 10 minutes in a blistering oven, your mushroom pizza comes out bubbly, brown and bursting with flavor.

A classic in the making.

Recipe

Mushroom Pizza with Cambozola Cheese and Cherries

8 ounces  raw pizza dough

8 ounces shiitake mushrooms

4 Tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

Salt and Pepper

1 clove garlic, minced

1 tsp fresh thyme

6 ounces Cambozola cheese

1/3 cup sweet dark cherries (they are in season)

Preheat your oven to 500 degrees.

Pit your cherries and slice them in half.  Set aside.

Shape the pizza dough into one or more oblong shapes and set on a cookie sheet.  Don’t bake it yet.

Remove the stems from your mushrooms (you can skip this step if you’re using Portobello mushrooms, but the stems on shiitake mushrooms are woody and should be discarded).  Slice the mushroom caps.

Heat 2 Tablespoons of the olive oil in a skillet.  Add the mushrooms, garlic and a generous pinch of salt and sauté over medium high heat until the mushrooms are soft and browned.

Brush your pizza dough with the remaining olive oil. Top with mushrooms, sprinkle with thyme, add cherries and arrange sliced cambozola cheese over the top.

Bake in a preheated oven for 8-10 minutes, or until the cheese is melted and bubbling and the crust has baked to a golden brown.  Slice and enjoy.

 

Looking for more pizza-making tips? Check out this Comprehensive Guide to Pizza Making from No Meal No Health.

Portobello Mushroom, Egg, & Pancetta Breakfast “Pizzas” from La Fuji Mama

This post comes to you by way of Mushroom Channel Featured Contributor Rachael of La Fuji Mama.

For breakfast most mornings I make hot oatmeal or miso soup for the girls and I. But a couple of days ago I woke up in the mood for a change. As I was peering inside the refrigerator, hoping for inspiration to hit, Bug ambled up behind me and took her own peak into the refrigerator. She spotted some Portobello mushrooms that I had picked up at the supermarket the day before and became really excited. So I pulled them out and looked at them for a moment, handing her one to examine.

As she turned the mushroom over in her hands, stroking the soft gills inside, and then putting the mushroom to her nose to smell, I thought about what I could do with the rest of them for breakfast. Then a package of pancetta caught my eye and inspiration struck: Portobello Mushroom, Egg, & Pancetta Breakfast “Pizzas.”

I removed the stems and then used a spoon to gently scrape out the gills. Then I brushed them with a bit of olive oil and put them in the oven to roast. While they were roasting I chopped the pancetta into small cubes, fried it until it was nice and crispy, scrambled some eggs, and then folded the fried pancetta into the scrambled eggs. Just as I was finishing scrambling the eggs, the mushrooms finished roasting. I pulled them out of the oven and gently blotted off the extra moisture. Then I topped each mushroom with scrambled eggs and sprinkled the eggs with a healthy dose of finely grated Gruyère cheese.

The juicy roasted Portobellos made wonderful “crusts” and tasted delicious paired with the fluffy scrambled eggs, salty pancetta, and the slightly earthy flavor of the Gruyère cheese. The girls each happily devoured half of a “pizza” and I ate a whole one and was pleasantly full.

The pizzas were quick and easy to make, only taking a total of about 20 minutes, and made for a nice change to our usual breakfast routine. You could always substitute your favorite cheese instead of using Gruyère, or use bacon rather than pancetta. I like to hand pick my mushrooms out of baskets of mushrooms that supermarkets often have, rather than buy pre-packaged Portobellos. This allows me to examine them and make sure that they are fresh. When you are picking your mushrooms, avoid any that look limp, dried out, or slippery (which indicates that they are past their prime). The mushroom should be firm and plump with a nice earthy smell.

Portobello Mushroom, Egg, & Pancetta Breakfast “Pizzas”

Makes 4 “pizzas” (4 — 6 servings)

4 Portobello mushrooms
3 tablespoons olive oil
8 large eggs
1/4 teaspoon salt, or to taste
1/4 teaspoon fresh ground black pepper, or to taste
1 tablespoon unsalted butter
4 — 5 ounces pancetta, cut into small cubes (you can substitute bacon)
4 ounces finely grated Gruyère cheese (you can substitute your favorite cheese)

1. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees Fahrenheit.

2. Use a kitchen towel to lightly brush off any remaining dirt on the mushrooms.  Remove the stem and then use a spoon to gently scrape out the gills inside the mushroom.  Brush the mushrooms lightly with olive oil and place them in a baking dish cap sides up.  Roast the mushrooms for 15 minutes (or 20 if your mushrooms are larger and thicker).

3. While the mushrooms are roasting, fry the pancetta in a large skillet over medium-high heat, stirring occasionally, until crispy.  Drain the pancetta on paper towels and set aside.

4. About 5 minutes before the mushrooms are done roasting, whisk the eggs, salt, and pepper in a mixing bowl just until the whites and yolks are blended.  Put the butter in a large heavy nonstick pan over medium heat.  When the butter is melted, swirl the pan to cover the bottom and sides.  Reserve 2 tablespoons of the beaten egg mixture, and then pour the rest of the egg mixture into the pan and turn the heat down to medium low.  Star slowly scraping the eggs from the bottom of the pan.  They will very gradually coagulate into soft curds over several minutes.  When they have thickened to your taste, remove the pan from the heat and fold in the reserved 2 tablespoons of egg mixture (to stop the cooking and cream the eggs).  Taste and season if needed.  Fold the fried pancetta into the just-scrambled eggs.

5. To assemble the breakfast “pizzas”: When the mushrooms have finished roasting, remove them from the oven and blot away any excess juices.  Spoon 1/4 of the scrambled eggs on top of each mushroom.  Top the eggs with 1/4 (1 ounces) of the finely shredded gruyère cheese and serve the pizzas immediately.

Weekly Links: Mushroom News from Around the Web

PU employees win “big” recipe contest In case you missed our recent post on the Big Ten Mushroom Recipe contest, check out this video from the local West Lafayette, Ind. news station, WLFI-TV, highlighting the Purdue Boilermakers’ big win.

Mushrooms should be part of your diet! As you Mushroom Channel readers already know, mushrooms are one of the most versatile veggies. Mushrooms can enhance any meal – from updating classic comfort food to highlighting the exotic flavors in ethnic cuisine. Both delicious and nutritious, mushrooms add flavor and excitement to any dish. Potassium, B vitamins and zinc are just a few of the important nutrients you get from enjoying mushrooms in your meal.

Today’s pizza toppings please every palate We knew mushrooms were popular, but did you know that 60 percent of consumers choose mushrooms as their veggie pizza topping? When ordering vegetables on pizza, mushrooms are the clear diner favorite!

Mushroom Mac & Cheese: Comfort Food with a Healthy Kick We’ve been talking about adding mushrooms to mac n’ cheese for quite some time now and you’ve probably heard of our Mushroom Taco Mac recipe. Check out how Traverse magazine adds mushrooms to this comfort food favorite, noting that mushrooms are the only fruit or vegetable with vitamin D.

5 ways to slash calories and lose weight Substitute a large portabella cap for your hamburger once a week and you could lose some weight – mushrooms are a hearty meat alternative that will leave even the biggest meat-lover satisfied.

Weekly Links: Mushroom News from Around the Web

Best and Worst Foods Keri Glassman, MS, RD, CDN tells “Early Show” viewers to always “Go for those ‘shrooms!” She makes note of the fact that it’s not always those bright colored veggies that pack a nutritious punch – those that are light in color do too, like mushrooms! Light-colored mushrooms are the leading source of the antioxidant selenium in the produce aisle.

Trend Alert: The ‘Fifth Taste’ Is Coming On Strong, As More People Say I Want My Umami We’ve heard that this is the year for umami and don’t you bet that WE of all people are excited! If you haven’t heard, umami is the savory fifth taste found naturally in mushrooms. Delish.  

How to Order a Healthier Pizza The Baltimore Sun helps readers make healthier pizza choices by advising to load up on the veggies – in particular mushrooms because they are nutrient-packed, high in fiber and low in calories.

Keri Glassman and The O2 Diet Glassman touts her love for mushrooms again in this segment featured on “700 Club.” She highlights mushrooms as the only fruit or veggie with vitamin D, which is very important for immunity. Also discussed are the benefits of swapping meat for mushrooms – if you take away about four ounces of meat a weak and substitute it with mushrooms, you can lose about five pounds over one year!