Posts Tagged ‘shiitake’

6 Varieties, Recipes and Fungi Facts to Celebrate Mushroom Month

It’s our favorite month of the year: Mushroom Month! To celebrate, here are a few fungi facts to remember why we have “mushroom” in our hearts for nature’s hidden treasure:

  • Mushrooms are full of umami – the fifth basic taste after sweet, salty, bitter and sour. Umami is derived from the Japanese word meaning “delicious.”
  • From crunchy enoki to meaty portobellos, mushroom varieties offer a range of flavors and textures.
  • Mushrooms are the only source of vitamin D in the produce aisle. One serving of UV-exposed crimini mushrooms can provide you with 1086 IU of vitamin D.
  • All mushrooms deliver beneficial nutrients such as copper, selenium and B vitamins, but did you know that different mushroom varieties offer different health benefits?
  • Mushrooms are gentle on the planet: Up to one million pounds of mushrooms can be grown on just one acre of land.
  • Mushrooms + Meat = The Blend – one of the easiest ways you can make your favorite meals more delicious, nutritious and sustainable.

What’s your favorite mushroom variety and recipe? The six recipes below each feature a different variety – try them all this Mushroom Month!

LIVE ‘Shroom Cam for Mushroom Month


This National Mushroom Month, we’re opening the gates to one of our mushroom farms to show you how mushrooms are grown. Visit ShroomCam.com to watch the mysterious mushroom growing process in action!

6 Recipes for Mushroom Month

Olive and Feta Stuffed Mushrooms

Olive and Feta Stuffed Mushrooms
Use white button mushrooms, hummus and olives to create umami-packed stuffed mushrooms.

Mexican Mushroom Meatball Soup

Mexican Mushroom Meatball Soup
Blend crimini mushrooms with beef and pork to create savory meatballs in this hearty, full-bodied Mexican-inspired soup.

Grilled Portobello Burger

Grilled Portobello Burgers
Portobello mushroom burgers are marinated in a homemade barbecue spice mix and grilled until tender.

Beef and Maitake Mushroom Meatball Burger with Tomato Butter Sauce

Beef and Maitake Mushroom Meatball Burger
This blended burger combines maitake mushrooms with ground beef and bacon, smothered in buttery tomato sauce.

Enoki Miso Soup

Enoki Miso Noodle Soup
Keep it simple and delicious with this no-fuss, 6-ingredient enoki mushroom and noodle soup.

Beef, Shiitake and Snow Pea Stir Fry

Beef, Shiitake and Snow Pea Stir Fry
Dinner is served with this easy Asian stir-fry that combines shiitakes, steak and snow peas.

Mushroom Varieties Offer Different Health Benefits

DYK: Different mushroom varieties offer different health benefits. Read on to learn more!

While it’s easy to decipher between shapes and colors, it’s not as easy to see the nutritional differences between mushrooms. Mushrooms are a nutrient powerhouse with each type offering beneficial nutrients such as vitamin D, selenium and B vitamins.

Health Benefits of Mushroom Varieties

This March, during National Nutrition Month,“Put Your Best Fork Forward” and dive deeper into the leading health benefits[1] behind four common mushroom varieties.

Low-Calorie

Opt for white buttons: Boasting just 18.5 calories per serving[2], white button mushrooms contain the lowest calories of all mushroom varieties. Additionally, white buttons provide 15 percent of the daily recommended intake of the vitamin B3, niacin. Niacin may promote healthy skin and digestive health.

Bone Health

Say hello to shiitakes: One serving of shiitake mushrooms is an excellent source of copper, offering 40 percent of the recommended daily intake. Copper helps keep bones and nerves healthy.

Immunity

Choose cremini: One serving of cremini mushrooms is an excellent source of selenium, containing 31 percent of the recommended daily intake. Selenium may help the immune system function properly.

Vitamin D

Make room for maitake: One serving of maitake mushrooms contains a whopping 236 percent of the daily recommended intake of vitamin D. Vitamin D may help build and maintain strong bones by helping the body absorb calcium. Additionally, it may support cell growth, neuromuscular and immune function, and help reduce inflammation.

[1] Mushroom Varieties Chart and Nutrition by Varieties

[2] Average serving size is 4-5 mushrooms.

Creamy Roasted Mushroom Parsnip Soup

Soup weather is here, meaning it’s time to get out of the cold and curl up with a big bowl (or two!). This creamy soup by Chez Us is rich, smooth, and believe it or not, doesn’t contain any dairy. It’s a great option for lunch or dinner.

Creamy Roasted Mushroom Parsnip Soup by Chez Us

I use to be more of a fair weather cook which meant I enjoyed the warmer seasons and took full advantage of summer’s bounty. Now, I have to admit that I am more of a cold weather home chef and enjoy nothing more than the comfort of a hearty soup or stew to warm up chilly evenings. The days and nights have finally begun to chill down in California, and I have begun taking advantage by making big pots of hearty soups. This recipe for Roasted Mushroom Parsnip Soup came about after a trip to London where I fell in love with a similar hearty recipe.

I am big on making creamy soups that do not require dairy to create that smooth, creamy texture. I achieve this indulgent bowl of soup, by using ingredients that are rich in flavor, cooking them long and slow, then pureeing in a food processor. Everyone is surprised at how flavorful the soups are without the added richness of cream or milk.

Creamy Roasted Mushroom Parsnip Soup by Chez Us

The depth of this recipe comes from roasting the mushrooms and parsnips before simmering with the other ingredients. While I roast root vegetables all the time, I did not begin working on roasted mushroom recipes until recently. I LOVE the character that comes with roasting mushrooms, even more so than sautéing them. Roasting the mushrooms adds a crazy depth to an already delicious ingredient by bringing out the earthy flavor and creating a rich, caramelized color.

Creamy Roasted Mushroom Parsnip Soup by Chez Us

Roasted Mushroom Parsnip Soup

What I love the most about this winter recipe is how easy it is to make, and how rich and flavorful it is.

Ingredients:
1 pound cremini mushrooms, cleaned and cut into quarters
1 pound parsnips, peeled and cut into 1″ pieces
3 tablespoons + 2 teaspoons olive oil
1/3 cup leek, whites only, thinly sliced
1 clove garlic, smashed
1 teaspoon dried thyme
5 cups vegetable stock
1/4 pound shiitake mushrooms, cleaned and thinly sliced
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 clove garlic, finely minced
sprigs of thyme
kosher salt, to taste
black pepper to taste

Method:
• Preheat the oven to 425.
• Place the parsnips on a baking sheet, drizzle 1 tablespoon of olive oil over the top and toss to mix. Roast for 15 minutes.
• Remove the parsnips from the oven and add the mushrooms. Drizzle the remaining 2 tablespoons of olive oil over the top, using a spoon stir to mix. Roast for 15 minutes.
• In a dutch oven heat 2 teaspoons of olive oil over medium low heat, then add the leeks. Stir and cook until soft, about 3 – 5 minutes.
• Add 1 of the cloves of garlic (the smashed one). Stir.
• Then add the mushroom mixture, thyme and the stock. Stir.
• Bring to a boil, then lower the heat to a very low simmer and cook for 30 minutes.
• Let cool for 5 minutes.
• Using a food processor, in batches puree the mixture until smooth.
• Return to the dutch oven. Season with salt and pepper then gently reheat over very low heat.
• In a small saucepan heat the 2 tablespoons of olive oil over medium low heat. Add the shiitake mushrooms, stir and cook until lightly golden. This will take about 5 minutes. Stir in the garlic and season with salt and pepper.
• To serve place some of the soup in a soup bowl, garnish with some of the shiitake mushrooms and a sprig of thyme.

Tagliatelle Pasta with a Light Mushroom Sauce

Denise from Chez Us shares her tasty Tagliatelle Pasta with a Light Mushroom Sauce with us!

Tagliatelle Pasta with a Light Mushroom Sauce by Chez Us

June is here, and it is time to start thinking about eating lighter during the hot summer months.  As I write those words I think to myself that it is rather funny, as being in the Bay Area, June is the coldest summer ever, and we are still enjoying hearty comfort food.  Regardless, this recipe for  Tagliatelle Pasta with a Light Mushroom Sauce is not only perfect as lighter fare, but it is comfortable food as well as being a quick and easy dinner option.

Tagliatelle Pasta with a Light Mushroom Sauce by Chez UsTagliatelle Pasta with a Light Mushroom Sauce by Chez Us

If you are like me, I always have a stash of mushrooms tucked into the vegetable bin, as they can go from breakfast to dinner in a matter of a few ingredients.  In our home, Wednesday tends to be the busiest evening for us, and this dish makes it on to the table very often.  It is quick and I can have dinner on the table within 30 minutes.

I like to use a mixture of mushrooms from earthy cremini to tender white buttons.  Shiitake mushrooms add a bit of mystery to a dish, as well, their texture is really outstanding.  I simply sautéed the mushrooms with olive oil, shallots and garlic;  I use green garlic when in season.  There is enough moisture in the mushrooms that it is not necessary to add any stock or water.  Besides the mushrooms, I use thyme as well as some heat with chili flakes which enhances the flavors of the mushrooms.  If I have a jar of artichoke hearts in the pantry, I roughly chop them and toss in before serving.

What are some of your favorite fresh and light mushroom recipes for summer time dining?  I am sure you will enjoy this refreshing recipe as much as we do.

 

Tagliatelle Pasta with a Light Mushroom Sauce

** serves 4

Ingredients

1 package of tagliatelle pasta (serves 4)
3 tablespoons olive oil
1 medium shallot, finely minced
2 garlic cloves, finely minced
12 cremini mushrooms
12 white mushrooms
12 small shiitake mushrooms
1 tablespoon fresh thyme or 1 teaspoon dried thyme
1 teaspoon (more or less depending on heat) chili pepper flakes
1 6 ounce jar marinated artichoke hearts, roughly chopped – optional
kosher salt and black pepper to taste
asiago cheese

Method:

1. Thinly slice the mushrooms and set aside.

2. In a large frying pan over medium low, heat the olive oil, then add the shallots and garlic.  Cook until soft, about 3 minutes.

3. Add the mushrooms, stir and cook over medium low until caramelized and soft.  This step will take about 6 – 10 minutes depending on the heat of your stove.

4. Stir in the thyme and chili flakes, then remove from the heat.

5. Cook the pasta according to package directions.

6. Drain the pasta, then immediately toss with the mushrooms and a drizzle of olive oil.  The heat of the pasta and the moisture on left from draining will heat the mushrooms.  At this point if you are using the artichoke hearts stir them in.

7. Season to taste with salt and pepper.  Grate cheese over the top.

8. Serve.

9. Eat.

Mushroom Lover’s Eggs Benedict

Handy kitchen work and creative thinking from We Are Not Martha takes a classic brunch staple, eggs benedict, and gives it a modern, tasty twist.

For as long as I can remember, I’ve judged restaurant brunches on their eggs benedict. If eggs benedict is on the menu, without a doubt I order it. While traditional eggs benedict is almost always heavenly, I get even more excited if I spot a bit of a variation. Like crab cake eggs benedict because that’s as far as restaurants tend to go. They just don’t seem to get very creative with this brunch item, probably assuming, “Why mess with a wonderful thing?” While I generally agree with that sentiment, I’ll answer you why, “To make it even better!” And better comes from the addition of mushrooms. Enter Mushroom Lover’s Eggs Benedict.

There are many things that can take eggs benedict to the next level, but there are some essentials in my book. The English muffin must be replaced with a biscuit. I knew I’d be baking biscuits for my Mushroom Lover’s Eggs Benedict and decided to pack the biscuits full of crimini mushrooms to add to the flavor punch. Instead of laboring over a hollandaise sauce, I whipped up a simple mushroom sauce to top the benedict. I also replaced the ham with a layer of lightly sautéed kale for an added tangy touch. The egg remained the same, perfectly poached with a beautiful runny yolk.

You want your eggs benedict to be packed with an earthy flavor that brings comfort to your soul, making you feel right at home with your loved ones for the rest of your weekend afternoon.

 

Mushroom Biscuits (makes about 12):

  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 8 oz chopped crimini mushrooms
  • 2 2/3 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon cream of tartar
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon pepper
  • 1/2 cup (1 stick) chilled butter, cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 1 egg
  • 1 1/4 cup milk

Benedict with Mushroom Sauce (makes 2 serving of benedict):

  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 4 oz shiitake mushrooms, sliced
  • 1 tablespoon marsala wine
  • 3/4 cup milk
  • 1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
  • Salt and pepper
  • 1 tablespoon vinegar
  • 4 eggs
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 3/4 cup torn kale leaves
  • 4 biscuits from above recipe

 

Mushroom Biscuits:

1) Sauté the mushrooms in olive oil over medium heat, until softened.

2) In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder, cream of tartar, salt and pepper.

3) Add the chilled butter into the flour mixture and work it into the mix with a pastry blender or your fingers, until the mixture resembles coarse sand.

4) In a separate bowl, whisk together the egg and milk. Add to the flour mixture and mix until it’s just incorporated.

5) Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Scoop about 1/4 cup of dough and place on baking sheet. Continue placing dough about 2 inches apart.

6) Bake at 400 degrees for about 20 minutes, until biscuits are just turning brown.

Benedict with Mushroom Sauce:

1) Melt the butter in a saucepan over medium heat. Once melted, add the mushrooms and sauté until they’re softened. Stir in marsala wine, cooking for about 1 minute.

2) Add in milk and flour. Whisk vigorously until sauce thickens, about 2-3 minutes. Season with salt and pepper then remove from heat.

3) To poach eggs, bring water to a boil in a large skillet with vinegar. Crack eggs into two bowls (2 in each) and gently drop into water. Remove skillet from heat and cover. Let eggs cook for 5 minutes. Remove with slotted spoon to paper towel-lined plate.

4) Heat olive oil in small skillet. Put kale in skillet and sauté until wilting and a tiny bit crispy. Remove from pan.

4) Put 2 biscuits on each plate, flat side up. Top each with kale and a poached egg. Spoon mushroom sauce over the top.

Enjoy!