Posts Tagged ‘vegan’

Grilled Mushroom Kabobs

Robyn from Add a Pinch shares her delicious grilled mushroom kabobs with us.

Grilling is a favorite way to prepare our food throughout the warmer months of the summer. From juicy burgers to as many of the sides as possible, we just love the flavors that grilling brings out in so many dishes. Not to mention, it keeps the kitchen cooler!

One of our favorite sides that goes well with just about any menu are these grilled mushroom kabobs. So easy to assemble, they are then marinated and then tossed onto the grill for a few minutes to let the grill work its magic! And let’s face it, there is just something about serving food on a stick that has everyone from the adults to the kids excited!

Grilled Mushroom Kabobs by Add a Pinch

These simple kabobs are great to assemble ahead of time, place onto a plate or rimmed baking sheet and then cover tightly with wrap. They can be made up to a couple of days ahead to save prep time when entertaining or on those busy weeknights! Everyone needs a side dish recipe like that!

Grilled Mushroom Kabobs Recipe

For the Mushroom Kabobs

  • 1 pint whole mushrooms, portabella or white
  • 1 green pepper, deseeded and cut into 2-inch pieces
  • 1 yellow pepper, deseeded and cut into 2-inch pieces
  • 1 onion, cut into 2-inch pieces
  • 1 pint grape tomatoes

For the Marinade

  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • Juice of 1 lemon
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt

Instructions

Arrange ingredients on the skewers in the pattern you prefer. Place onto a rimmed platter or baking sheet. Whisk together all ingredients for the marinade and pour over assembled skewers. Place kabobs onto grill heated to medium heat and cook 4 to 5 minutes on both sides for a total of 8 to 10 minutes. Remove kabobs to a serving tray.

If making ahead, cover tightly with wrap and place in the refrigerator until about 15 minutes prior to cooking.

Featured Contributor: Yaki Shiitake from La Fuji Mama

Editor’s Note: Rachael is the inventive home chef behind La Fuji Mama. Now a mother of two, many of her dishes take inspiration from the time she spent living in Japan. While she’s no stranger to mushrooms (the Japanese diet are rich with them), this is her first post for the Mushroom Channel. Check out her recipe below but make the jump over to her main site when you’re done!

Yakitori, a dish of chicken threaded on skewers and cooked over a charcoal fire, is one of those foods that I start to crave when the weather turns sunny and warm. With all the beautiful weather we’ve been having, I decided it was time to break out the bamboo skewers and make some. Instead of making the traditional chicken skewers, I used fresh shiitake mushrooms and sliced scallions. Shiitake mushrooms, a native fungi of Japan, have a rich meaty and slightly smokey flavor. These mushrooms are fat free and a great source of protein, iron, dietary fiber, and vitamin C. Grilling them brings out their wonderful meaty flavor. You’ll find you won’t miss the chicken!

This is also a great way to introduce kids to shiitake mushrooms. I’ve found that kids are more receptive to anything served on a stick. Case in point—when my three year old saw we were making yakitori, she got very excited and told me, “I want some!” She didn’t even know what we were putting on those skewers!

Yakitori, a dish of chicken threaded on skewers and cooked over a charcoal fire, is one of those foods that I start to crave when the weather turns sunny and warm. With all the beautiful weather we’ve been having, I decided it was time to break out the bamboo skewers and make some. Instead of making the traditional chicken skewers, I used fresh shiitake mushrooms and sliced scallions. Shiitake mushrooms, a native fungi of Japan, have a rich meaty and slightly smokey flavor. These mushrooms are fat free and a great source of protein, iron, dietary fiber, and vitamin C. Grilling them brings out their wonderful meaty flavor. You’ll find you won’t miss the chicken!

When you are buying shiitake mushrooms, look for mushrooms that are plump, firm, and clean, and avoid any that have wet slimy spots on them or are wrinkled. They can be stored in the refrigerator in a loosely closed paper bag for about a week until you are ready to use them. Making the skewers is easy. You simple clean the mushrooms and discard their stems, and wash and cut the scallions into pieces. Then you thread the mushrooms and scallions onto the skewers. Make sure to soak your bamboo skewers beforehand so that they do not burn. Fresh shiitake mushrooms mushrooms are soft, so do not squeeze or push too hard. If you are having difficulty pushing the skewer through a mushroom, gently rotate the skewer as you are trying to push it through.

When you have finished putting the skewers together, you brush them with a tiny bit of vegetable oil and then set them on a preheated grill, with the mushrooms facing gill side up. You can also cook these skewers under the broiler. If you do this, make sure you start by cooking the skewers gill side down.

When the skewers have finished cooking and you are ready to serve them, brush them with a bit of tare (a slightly sweet and savory Japanese basting sauce) and serve them. They make a fabulous appetizer or side dish for a Spring or Summertime menu.

Yaki Shiitake (Shiitake & Scallion Yakitori)

Makes 8 skewers

For the tare (basting sauce):
½ cup soy sauce
½ cup mirin
¼ granulated sugar

For the skewers:
16 large fresh shiitake mushrooms, preferably donko
1 bunch scallions
Vegetable oil

1. Make the tare: Put the soy sauce, mirin, and sugar into a small saucepan and cook over medium-low heat. When the mixture begins to boil, reduce the heat to low, and continue cooking over low heat for 20 minutes. Skim any scum off the surface as the sauce is cooking. Set aside.

2. Make the skewers: Soak the bamboo skewers in water for 20 minutes. Preheat the grill. Clean the mushrooms with a slightly damp paper towel or cotton cloth, then cut away and discard the stems. Cut the firm white and whitish green parts of the scallions into 1 ¾ inch lengths.

3. Thread two mushrooms (lengthwise through the mushroom caps) and two pieces of scallion onto each skewer, alternating between the mushrooms and scallion pieces. Brush the mushrooms and scallions with a light layer of vegetable oil.

4. Place the skewers on the grill, with mushrooms facing gill side up. Cook the skewers until the tops of the mushroom caps are dry. Turn the skewers over (mushrooms gill side down), and cook them until the insides become wet with the mushrooms’ own juice. Turn the skewers over (mushrooms gill side up) one more time and cook for about 1 or 2 minutes more until the mushrooms and scallions are completely cooked through.

5. Remove the skewers from the grill, and with a pastry brush, baste them with the tare. Arrange the skewers on a large plate and serve.
Yakitori, a dish of chicken threaded on skewers and cooked over a charcoal fire, is one of those foods that I start to crave when the weather turns sunny and warm. With all the beautiful weather we’ve been having, I decided it was time to break out the bamboo skewers and make some. Instead of making the traditional chicken skewers, I used fresh shiitake mushrooms and sliced scallions. Shiitake mushrooms, a native fungi of Japan, have a rich meaty and slightly smokey flavor. These mushrooms are fat free and a great source of protein, iron, dietary fiber, and vitamin C. Grilling them brings out their wonderful meaty flavor. You’ll find you won’t miss the chicken!

A Mid-Week Mushroom Salad Revelation

Mushroom Celery SaladI don’t know about you, but by mid-week? I’m usually pretty tired by the time I mosey into my tiny kitchen for mealtime.  That said, few things make me feel healthier or more productive than cooking.  Lucky that we live in times with such a plethora of simple but satisfying recipes at our fingertips!

This salad was introduced to me by a friend basing it loosely on a Giada De Laurentiis creation. It’s about as easy as it gets with 4 main ingredients plus seasoning and with no cooking required, it’s my perfect midweek mushroom fix!

  • 1 pound white button mushrooms, thinly sliced
  • 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil, plus 1 tablespoon
  • 1 teaspoon salt, plus more to taste
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, plus more to taste
  • 4 large celery stalks, thinly sliced crosswise
  • 1/2 cup chopped fresh parsley leaves
  • Juice of half a lemon

Directions

Place the mushrooms in a medium bowl and toss with 1/4 cup of olive oil, 1 teaspoon salt, and 1/2 teaspoon pepper. Layer the mushrooms on the bottom of a straight-sided glass salad bowl. Place the celery in the same medium bowl used to toss the mushrooms. Toss with 1 tablespoon olive oil and a pinch of salt and pepper. Layer the celery on top of the mushrooms. Sprinkle the parsley over the celery. Squeeze lemon juice over the top. Serve.

The original recipe calls for sprinkled Romano as well but I find the vegan version seriously satisfying!

Weekly Links: Mushroom News from Around the Web

Surprise: Mushrooms full of nutrients Don’t be fooled by mushrooms and their lack of color – just because mushrooms are white does not mean they are not nutritional powerhouses. The Detroit Free Press alerts readers of this common misperception, and notes that mushrooms are in fact dense in nutrients. Not only do they supply B vitamins like riboflavin, niacin and pantothenic acid for energy, but they also are rich in folic acid, iron, potassium and antioxidants like selenium. Get these nutrients by giving their recipe for Mushroom Almond Paté a try at your New Year’s Eve party!

Wild Mushroom Mix Enjoy this vegan and gluten-free mushroom mixture atop pizzas, as a dip with crostinis for an appetizer, or even use it as the base for a hearty mushroom soup! The versatility is endless!

Top 10 health tips for 2010 Our friends from Canada over at The Daily Observer share the most important health tips for 2010. Aside from vitamin D topping the list (be sure to eat your mushrooms!), washing your hands to prevent catching airborne illnesses and measuring your waistline rather than hopping on a scale is recommended. Belly fat is particularly dangerous, possibly leading to a higher risk for heart disease, diabetes and high blood pressure. Measuring tapes are less expensive than scales anyway…

Drug from mushroom may help treat cancer Unrelated to our research at City of Hope on white button mushrooms and breast cancer, researchers at the University of Nottingham have discovered that a wild mushroom native to China, cordyceps, may be effective in treating cancer as well. “The researchers say low-dose cordycepin (the medication that includes cordyceps) seems to inhibit the uncontrolled growth and division of cells and at high doses it also inhibits growth by stopping cells from sticking together.” Aren’t mushrooms amazing?

Umami Girl's Vegetarian Mushroom Stuffing with Gravy

MC Editor Note: We have a new guest contributor among us! Everyone give a warm, seasonal welcome to Umami Girl!

Photo Credit: Carolyn Cope for Umami GirlThanksgiving at our house inspires a devotion that borders on the comical. A day when the whole country stops to give thanks for delicious food is essentially a national endorsement of our family’s way of life, and we think that’s really something to celebrate.

Most of the time our devotion borders on the comical. Then, of course, there are the times when devotion shows its passport, crosses the border and never looks back. We train for Thanksgiving dinner the way runners train for a marathon. With a certain scientific precision, all meals on Thanksgiving Eve balance maximum stomach stretching with minimal caloric intake. Several family members arrive on the big day with elastic-waisted sweatpants in tow, in case the need arises before dessert. And then, of course, there’s the stuff-off.

Its proper name is The Great Great-Grandmas’ Stuff-Off, but don’t try to say that five times in a row after the tryptophan hits your bloodstream. Each year the two family matriarchs prepare their two outrageous stuffings. This recipe is adapted from one of them.

Although the original recipe contains no small amount of meat, I’ve adapted it over time into a vegetarian dish. With all the savory, meaty mushrooms in this version, it’s sure to please carnivores and vegetarians alike. The gravy is our go-to recipe for a versatile vegetarian sauce. It can also be prepared with turkey stock if that’s how you like to gobble.

Umami Girl’s Vegetarian Mushroom Stuffing

Ingredients
1 1/2 to 2 baguettes, cut into 1-inch cubes (12 slightly heaping cups)
6 Tablespoons butter
2 medium onions, diced
3 stalks celery, with leaves, diced
1 teaspoon salt, divided
1/8 teaspoon pepper
8 ounces shiitake mushrooms, stems removed, caps halved if large and sliced
8 ounces cremini mushrooms, halved if large and sliced
4 cloves garlic, chopped
1 Tablespoon minced fresh thyme
2 Tablespoons minced fresh sage
1 cup dry white wine
3 large eggs
2 1/2 cups vegetable stock
1/4 cup minced flat-leaf parsley

Method
1. Preheat the oven to 250° F. Arrange the bread cubes in a single layer on a baking sheet and place in the oven for 25 minutes to dry. (Alternatively, leave the bread cubes out, uncovered, overnight.) Remove the bread from the oven and raise the oven temperature to 375° F.

2. Meanwhile, in a wide pan, melt the butter over medium-high heat. Add the onions and celery along with 1/2 teaspoon of the salt and the pepper. Cook, stirring occasionally, until beginning to soften, about 5 minutes. Add the mushrooms, garlic, thyme and sage and cook, stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms have halved in volume, about 8 minutes. Add the wine and cook, stirring occasionally, for 2 minutes. There will still be liquid left in the pan. Remove from the heat to cool slightly.

3. In a very large bowl, beat the eggs with a fork until slightly frothy. Add the remaining 1/2 teaspoon salt and the vegetable stock and stir to combine. Add the bread, the mushroom mixture and the parsley and stir to combine thoroughly. Let the mixture sit for a few minutes, stirring occasionally, until the bread has absorbed all the liquid.

4. Bake in a 3-quart covered casserole or a deep 13×9-inch pan covered with aluminum foil for 35 minutes. Then remove the cover and bake 15 minutes more. Serve hot with mushroom gravy.

Note: You can, of course, also bake this recipe stuffed inside a turkey. It will fill an approximately 17-pound bird.

Umami Girl’s Vegetarian Mushroom Gravy

Ingredients
2 Tablespoons butter
4 garlic cloves, chopped
6 ounces shiitake mushrooms, stems removed, caps halved if large and thinly sliced
6 ounces cremini mushrooms, thinly sliced
2 Tablespoons all-purpose flour
1/2 cup dry white wine
2 1/2 cups vegetable stock
2 Tablespoons soy sauce
Freshly ground black pepper, to taste

Method
1. Melt the butter over medium-high heat in a wide pan. (If making the stuffing, you can use the same pan from Step 2 without washing.) Add the garlic and mushrooms and cook, stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are browned in spots and substantially reduced in volume, 5 to 8 minutes. Sprinkle the flour over the mushrooms and cook, stirring constantly to prevent burning, for one minute.

2. Add the wine and stir for one minute, scraping up any bits of flour from the bottom of the pan. Then add the soy sauce and vegetable stock along with a generous amount of freshly ground black pepper. Bring to a boil, stirring frequently. Reduce the heat to maintain a brisk simmer and cook until the gravy thickens slightly, 5 minutes or more.