Posts Tagged ‘Veggies’

Pesto Portobello Pizzas

Paula of bell’alimento shares a perfect pesto portobello pizza recipe with a lighter side.

When you’re wanting a “lighter” pizza option this one will fit that bill perfectly. Our personal pesto portobello pizzas are the perfect portion for a light lunch or even can be served as an hors de vors for all your summer entertaining.

Portobello Pizzas Paula of bell’alimento

We start by gently removing the mushroom gills by scraping them with a spoon. To keep our shrooms from getting soggy we like to bake ours upside down on a muffin tin so that it collects the liquid and makes it much easier to discard.

Then we’ll use our favorite pesto add the cheese and cherry tomatoes and bake until golden and bubbly.

Easy peasy gluten free portobello pizza perfection.

Portobello Pizzas by Paula of bell’alimento

Pesto Portobello Pizzas

Yield: 2
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 10-15 minutes

Ingredients:
2 large portobello mushrooms – cleaned and gills removed
2 teaspoons pesto
1/2 -3/4 cup grated mozzarella cheese
3-4 cherry tomatoes – halved
kosher salt/pepper
fresh basil leaves

Directions:
1. Preheat oven to broil.

2. Place mushroom caps upside down on a muffin pan. Bake for 5-10 minutes until mushrooms have just begun to soften. Discard liquid.

2. Equally divide pesto between mushroom caps. Using a silicone brush, spread pesto on inside of mushroom caps.

3. Equally divide cheese between mushroom caps.

4. Equally divide tomatoes between mushroom caps. Arrange on top of cheese. Season with salt and pepper.

5. Turn oven to broil. Return mushrooms to oven and bake for additional 5 minutes OR until cheese has melted.

6. Garnish with fresh basil.

Fall into Good Eating Habits: 5 Easy Things to Just Add In

David Grotto, RDN, LDN is sharing a prep ahead trick that will add a healthy dose of veggies to your favorite dishes this season.

Mushroom Tacos with Salsa Verde

Before you read another word, let’s address your biggest food fears. Surrendering taste, enjoyment and a full belly often top the list. Luckily, I am here to share great news! These tips don’t require you to spend all day in the kitchen. Yay! Sit back, relax and I’ll show you five easy and nutritious ingredients to “just add in” for a sneak-attack approach to good health.

Everyone wants to eat healthy, but not everyone has heard that great taste, satisfaction, a full belly and good health can co-exist. One of the secrets I share with my patients and readers is that adding in vegetables can really improve the nutrition profile of a dish without sacrificing taste. Adding veggies in place of some or all of the fat can also help lower calories. But for today’s example, this is simply about adding in veggies without kicking any other ingredient to the curb. Whether you choose to tell anyone of your master plan, that’s completely up to you – your secret is safe with me.

What you need to get started:

  • A blender or food processor.
  • Canned beans
  • Fresh frozen or canned spinach
  • Fresh mushrooms
  • Sweet potatoes
  • Winter squash
  • An ice cube tray
  • Water or vegetarian chicken broth

Final Product: Five different veggie cubes that make a simple addition to just about any dish.

1. Mushrooms: You really get a culinary and health 2-for-1 out of this veggie. Mushrooms add a nice savory flavor and volume with very little calories. Don’t even get me started on the added value of vitamin D, selenium and cholesterol-lowering beta-glucans.

Procedure: Add cleaned raw or cooked mushrooms to a blender or food processor add a splash of water or broth to make a thick liquid after blending. The idea here is to add just enough liquid to make it pourable. When blended to the right consistency, pour into an ice cube tray and freeze.

Add it to: Soups, sauces, gravies, dips, taco meat, chili, risotto, ground meat and more.

2. Spinach: This veggie gives you the most bang for the nutrition buck compared to any other leafy green. It’s an excellent source of 12 nutrients including calcium, iron, magnesium and vitamin C.

Procedure: Add cleaned raw or cooked spinach to a blender or food processor and add a splash of water or broth to make a thick liquid after blending. When blended to the right consistency, pour into an ice cube tray and freeze.

Add it to: Soups, sauces, dips, smoothies, dressings, taco meat, chili, risotto, ground meat and more.

3. Beans: Loaded with protein, fiber, b-vitamins and iron as well as a host of other nutrients.

Procedure: Add canned or cooked to a blender or food processor and add a splash of water or broth to make a thick liquid after blending. When blended to the right consistency, pour into an ice cube tray and freeze.

Add it to: Soups, sauces, dips, dressings, taco meat, chili, risotto and more.

4. Sweet Potato: This sweet veggie is an excellent source of fiber, vitamin A, C and potassium.

Procedure: Add cooked, peeled sweet potatoes to a blender or food processor add a splash of water or broth to make a thick liquid after blending. When blended to the right consistency, pour into an ice cube tray and freeze.

Add it to: Mac & cheese, soups, sauces, dips, oatmeal, brownies, smoothies, dressings, chili, ground meat and more.

5. Winter Squash: Pumpkin, acorn, butternut, spaghetti or any other variety fit into this category. Winter squashes are a terrific source of nutrients such as beta carotene, fiber, iron and magnesium.

 Procedure: Add cooked or canned squash to a blender or food processor add a splash of water or broth to make a thick liquid after blending. When blended to the right consistency, pour into an ice cube tray and freeze.

 Add it to: Mac & cheese, soups, sauces, dips, oatmeal, brownies, smoothies, dressings, chili, ground meat and more.

 

Back-To-School Fruit & Veggie Makeovers

Mushroom Pear and Gorgonzola Bites

Image Courtesy of Running to the Kitchen – RECIPE HERE

Chef Jackie Newgent, RDN, shares her favorite tips for making veggies and fruits enticing to kids as the new school year kicks off.

It’s back-to-school time! What better time to give healthy eating a kick start. One of the most impactful ways to make a difference is to boost fruit and veggie intake.

In fact, adolescents in the U.S. currently have fruit just once a day and vegetables only 1.3 times a day.(1) So there’s plenty of room to have a positive impact on eating—and ultimately better health. When presented in new ways, fruits and veggies can be extra appealing to kids.

Try these simple, nutritious, and easily adaptable meal makeover tips throughout the day to give your kids’ eating plan a flavorful and fun update—most in just 60 seconds or less.

Breakfast:

Start the day on the right foot. It’s easier than you think to include veggies as part of your morning routine.

Before: Plain eggs

The Makeover: Eggs are a terrific vehicle in which to incorporate vegetables, such as mushrooms, broccoli, bell peppers, and more. However, there’s not always time to prepare a fancy omelet with all of the fixings. Salsa counts as a veggie. So top scrambled eggs with a salsa of choice whether mild or hot.

Lunch:

Lettuce and lunch are perfect partners—especially when kids are involved in the prep.

Before: Iceberg lettuce leaf on a ham sandwich

The Makeover: Leafy lettuce greens provide an easy way to enjoy veggies. Stack a mixture of them high on a sandwich. Or if your school has a salad bar, have the kids visit it so they can create their own munchable salad bowlful for a school lunch entrée or side.  

After- School Snack:

It’s not always about the food; it’s often the presentation of it that matters the most to kids.

Before: Green grapes

The Makeover: Add a fun factor when serving grapes. Simply freeze them and serve in a sundae dish for more dessert like appeal. Or insert a combination of red and green grapes onto skewers and freeze to create real grape popsicle kebabs.

Dinner:

Mushrooms provide a meaty taste and can provide a unique way to boost veggie servings at dinnertime.

Before: Burger made with ground turkey

The Makeover: A turkey burger is a tasty and healthful protein pick. It’s also a fantastic way to include vegetables. Sure, top it with tomato and onion. Go beyond toppings, too. The burger can be part veggie; just mix together about equal parts ground turkey and quickly sautéed finely chopped mushrooms, and form into patties.

Dessert/Evening Snack:

To satisfy a “sweet tooth”, focus on naturally sweet food first (yes, fruit!), rather than traditional dessert that can be full of added sugar.

Before: Banana

The Makeover: Bananas are a popular fruit. But kids don’t usually think of them as dessert. So turn bananas into a recognizable dessert. Peel, chop, and freeze in advance; then puree the frozen pieces in a food processor to create 60-second banana “ice cream!”

Need more fruit and veggie tips? Just ask us below—or connect with Jackie on Twitter @jackienewgent.

Source:

(1)   The State Indicator Report on Fruits and Vegetables, 2013, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 

Fight Summer Boredom with Kids in The Kitchen

Grilled Portabella Pizza
 

In April we were thrilled to introduce the “Healthy Lunchtime Challenge” launched as a part of First Lady Michele Obama’s “Let’s Move” initiative. Working in cooperation with the USDA, MyPlate, Epicurious and the US Department of Education, the First Lady urged kids to get creative and submit their favorite MyPlate inspired healthy lunch recipe. Last week the fifty-four winning recipes of the “Healthy Lunchtime Challenge” were announced and the aspiring chefs who submitted the winning entries were invited to the White House’s annual “Our Kids” state dinner.

Even though this year’s challenge is over, including kids in the preparation of meals can act as a great cure for summer boredom. With summer vacation in full swing, your kids may have entered the dreaded “Mom, I’m bored” phase. Instead of racking your brain for activities to keep them occupied while you cook, throw an apron their way and engage them in meal prep.

Is your child a finicky eater? Fear not! Kids are not only more likely to try new foods when they’ve helped prepare them, but are more likely to continue healthy eating practices if they are instilled early on. A couple of evenings in the kitchen could spark a lifelong appreciation for nutrition-packed mushrooms.

Without the looming deadlines of homework or athletics practice, this summer is the perfect time to share your favorite tasty mushroom recipes with your little ones. Swap mushrooms into your child’s favorite dish for a fresh take on an old favorite. We love using grilled portabellas as a healthier alternative to pizza crust. Make sure to check out our Pinterest board for even more Kid-Friendly Mushroom recipes.  Inviting children to help you whip up a healthy meal is not only a load off of your shoulders, but can become the foundation for a lifetime of health consciousness.

The USDA is a great resource for kitchen activities for kids. Here are just a few benefits for parents who involve their children in cooking:

  • Quality time spent with kids and their parents/caregivers
  • The opportunity for kids to learn how to cook
  • Kids are more likely to eat new foods that they’ve helped prepare.

Remember to put safety first when little ones are in the kitchen. Bubbling pots and sharp knives are hazards that require close adult supervision. In addition, encourage kids to wash their hands in warm soapy water before starting on your favorite recipe.

Bring your kids into the kitchen to cook your favorite mushroom dishes and enjoy the extra quality time with your loved ones! Here’s a few of our favorite recipes to get the ideas flowing!